Australian medical device company Anatomics has a very prolific 3D printing portfolio in the healthcare industry, from assisting with a 3D printed heel bone to 3D printing the first titanium sternum and set of ribs and vertebrae. Anatomics founder Paul D’urso, MD, a neurosurgeon at Epworth Healthcare, began his medical 3D printing research way back in 1991, four years before starting the not-for-profit Anatomics, which has since helped over 5,000 patients with its custom 3D printed medical solutions.

D’Urso said, “Anatomics has lead the world in custom 3D printed spine technology for over 20 years and is proud to have developed numerous world first applications.”

D’Urso has a particular interest in developing spinal applications for biomodelling, and at the recent 3DHEALS conference in San Francisco, reported that he’s used 3D printing in nearly 700 spinal fusion procedures, including what D’Urso tells us is “the world’s first custom occipito cervical plate.”

“In the future Anatomics plans to create disruptive Spinal Solution Centres that will enable Community Based Personalised Healthcare allowing surgeons and hospitals to 3D print a range of spinal implants and share designs through-out the world,” D’Urso told 3DPrint.com.

The success of some of the innovative 3D printed solutions that D’Urso and Anatomics have developed, including 3D printed custom spinal implants, have recently been described in articles and research papers printed in various publications, such as the European Spine Journal and the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.

The latter paper, titled “Designing patient-specific 3D printed devices for posterior atlantoaxial transarticular fixation surgery,” discussed how biomodelling and 3D printing are both useful tools for pre-surgical planning, developing titanium implants and patient-specific tools, and intraoperative stereotaxy – a minimally invasive surgical procedure which uses a 3D coordinate system to locate small targets inside the body and then perform an action, like an ablation, biopsy, injection, or implantation, on them.

By Sarah Saunders | 3DPRINT.COM

Image Credit: Anatomics

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