To the moms who have heard doctors say the worst about their children—they may not do this, they may not do that or that or that or that—and who repressed those “nots” in their heads and found hopes in their heart.

To the moms who have been told the insurance wouldn’t cover the therapy, the device, the piece of equipment—and who made call after call and sent letter after letter and who got the therapy or device or equipment covered.

To the moms who put away the grim medical records and the scary MRI scans and the dismal school reports and who focus on the child in front of their eyes, progressing at their own pace and being their own lovable selves.

To the moms who have been told the doctor/specialist/therapist had no room in their schedule for their child—and who tried, tried, tried again and got their child in.

To the moms who were told their child wasn’t ready for the communication device or the speech app and who, determined to enable their child, found ways to get the communication device or speech app to be accessible to their child.

To the moms who were told their children with disabilities couldn’t participate in a sports event, a dance class, a camp program—and who figured out a way to make it happen.

To the moms who, when people stare at their children sadly, say, “This is _____, would you like to say hello?” and try to get people to see the abilities.

To the moms who, despite the naysayers, have done the alterna-therapy. Because if it couldn’t hurt and it might help, it’s worth it.

To the moms who have been told at the IEP that the school couldn’t do this and couldn’t try that—and who, wait for it, made them happen.

To the moms who have been told their child likely wouldn’t make more progress in speech, walking, eating, whatever—and who said “That is N-O-T true” and who found a different doctor, specialist or therapist who could see their child’s potential…and whose child kept right on making progress.

Of course, every parent has to be an advocate for their child. But as the moms of children with disabilities, we have extra obstacles to overcome, extra tall buildings to leap over, extra mountains to climb. And while we don’t succeed every single time, we never stop trying every single day.

So to the moms who push for, advocate for, argue for, plead for, do everything for their children with disabilities:

Happy Supermoms Day to you.



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